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Model Rocketry Flight and Resources

Parents love to teach their children new exciting hobbies that will challenge them to think and use their imagination. Model rocketry can fulfill every parent's dream of their children succeeding in life. Researchers have proven that children exposed to model rocketry at an early age tend to develop an interest for mathematical and scientific disciplines. In addition, many of these children pursue careers as scientists, mathematicians, physicists, and engineers. Parents can safely launch model rockets constructed from wood, plastic, and other lightweight materials. Enthusiasts can enjoy their model rockets as long as it meets the National Association of Rocketry (NAR) Safety Code. Model rockets that fail to meet these requirements pose significant danger to the launcher.

The historical origins of model rocketry date back to the early 13th century, where the ancient Chinese converted black powder propelled objects into combat weapons. The Chinese referred to these objects as “arrows of fire.” In 1591, Jean Beavie recorded important ideas focused on multistage rockets. Multistaging successfully answers the question that many scientists pondered about escaping the Earth's gravitational pull. Over the years, many inventors and scientists experimented with creating their own propelled objects; however, none of these resembled the modern model rocket. In 1954, Orville Carlisle created a model rocket motor that would launch the field of model rocketry into action. Orville Carlisle and his brother Robert used the model rocket motor as a component in his lectures on the core ideas of rocket-powered flight.

After time lapsed, Orville read in PopularMechanics about the safety problems that occurred when young model rocket enthusiasts attempted to create their own rocket engines. Many young people started making their own model rockets after the successful launch of Sputnik that ended in tragedy quite often. The Carlisles quickly refined their motor design and marketed it as a safe outlet for model rocket hobbyists. They sent samples to G. Harry Stine who happened to build and fly the models himself before making a safety handbook for all amateur launchers. G. Harry Stine did not stop at making a safety handbook. In fact, he approached Vernon Estes with his model rockets. In 1958, Vernon founded Estes Industries, a manufacturer of model rockets still in existence today. The success of Estes prompted the emergence of several competitors, including Centuri, Cox, and Quest Aerospace. In addition, many model rocket enthusiasts became interested in high-powered rockets that would continue to expand into a major hobby for all amateur, intermediate, and professional rocketeers.

Model Rocketry Technical Manual

Estes provides an extensive technical manual on model rocketry, including construction techniques, types of materials to use, and launching methods.

Model Rocketry Safety
An introduction to the appropriate safety procedures used in the field of model rocketry.

Introduction to Model Rocketry
A homework assignment that engages students to participate in the construction of model rockets.

A Model Rocketeer's Resource
A webpage that includes links to personal launch reports, photographs, answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ), building tips, hints, reviews, and model rocket publications.

Model Rocket Design Plans

Jim Z provides an extensive list of documents that contain model rocket design plans from a variety of manufacturers, including Estes, Centuri, Enerjet/Mini-Max, Canaroc, MPC, and MRC.

A Model Rocketeer's Personal Page

Buzz's Model Rocketry webpage includes an extensive list of articles, plans, photographs, related documents, and other links related to the hobby.

Parts of a Model Rocket

A diagram with explanations of each part located on a model rocket.

Model Rocketry Pictures

A compilation of a model rocket enthusiast preparing to launch new creations.

Building a Model Rocket and the Science Behind It

A document that shares a comprehensive list of mathematical formulas and blueprints for creating a model rocket from scratch based on time-tested scientific disciplines.

The National Association of Model Rocketry: Safety Code

The official safety code in compliance with the National Association of Model Rocketry (NAR).

The Hitchhikers Guide to Model Rocketry

A website intended to network amateur, intermediate, and professional model rocketeers in their pursuit of mastering their hobby.

What are Model Rockets?
A webpage that provides the historical background on the hobby of model rocketry.

Model Rocketry Basics

A PowerPoint presentation that introduces the basic concepts of model rocketry, including what is model rocketry, who governs the hobby, what are the various model rocket classifications, what are the parts of a model rocket, what are high-powered rockets, and how to construct a model rocket from scratch.

The Beginner's Guide to Model Rockets

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) introduces an educational guide to model rocketry, including the mathematical concepts involved in the hobby.

Centuri's Model Rocket Designer Manual

An extensive guide that provides step-by-step instructions on how to create a model rocket from scratch.

The Heartland Organization of Rocketry (T.H.O.R.)

A professional organization dedicated to promoting, educating, and improving the field of model rocketry.

The Albuquerque Rocket Society

An association that provides information on local and national model rocketry events, including launch and technical information about different models schedule for inflight.

Model Rocketry: The Beginning

A lesson plan for middle school students searching to learn more about the historical origins and importance of model rocketry, starting from the ancient Chinese art of pyrotechnics to modern high-powered rockets.

Laws, Regulations, and Codes

A handbook of laws, regulations, and codes related to the hobby of model rocketry, including high-powered rockets.

How to Calculate a Rocket's Altitude

A scientific formula that helps enthusiasts estimate a model rocket's altitude in mid-flight.

Model and High Power Rocketry

A brief introduction to the hobby of model and high-powered rocketry, including safety code and parts analysis.

Larry Crump's Hi-Power Model Rocket Page

A personal page with uploads full of high-powered model rockets with photographs and descriptions of each launch.

Author: Angus L. McGuire

 


 

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